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Lawyers in Conflict and Transition

Lawyers in Conflict and Transition PDF Author: Kieran McEvoy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521853982
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 300

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Book Description
Studies what lawyers do in challenging contexts of conflict, authoritarianism, and the transition from violence.

Lawyers in Conflict and Transition

Lawyers in Conflict and Transition PDF Author: Kieran McEvoy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521853982
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 300

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Book Description
Studies what lawyers do in challenging contexts of conflict, authoritarianism, and the transition from violence.

Women Lawyers and the Struggle for Change in Conflict and Transition

Women Lawyers and the Struggle for Change in Conflict and Transition PDF Author: Anna Bryson
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 25

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Book Description
This article examines the particular experiences of female 'cause lawyers' in conflicted and transitional societies. Drawn from an ongoing comparative project which involved fieldwork in Cambodia, Chile, Israel, Palestine, Tunisia and South Africa, the paper looks at opportunities, obstacles and the obduracy required from such lawyers to 'make a difference' in these challenging contexts. Drawing upon the theoretical literature on the sociology of the legal profession, cause-lawyers, gender and transitional justice, and the structure/agency nexus, the article considers in turn the conflict cause-lawyering intersection and the work of cause-lawyers in transitional contexts. It concludes by arguing that the case-study of cause-lawyers offers a rebuttal to the charge that transitional justice is just like 'ordinary justice'. It also contends that, notwithstanding the durability of patriarchal power in transitional contexts, law remains a site of struggle, not acquiescence, and many of these cause-lawyers have and continue to exercise both agency and responsibility in 'taking on' that power.

Lawyers in 21st-Century Societies

Lawyers in 21st-Century Societies PDF Author: Richard L Abel
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1509931228
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 704

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Book Description
This book presents an invaluable collection of essays by eminent scholars from a wide variety of disciplines on the main issues currently confronting legal professions across the world. It does this through a comparative analysis of the data provided by the reports on 46 countries in its companion volume: Lawyers in 21st-Century Societies: Vol. 1: National Reports (Hart 2020). Together these volumes build on the seminal collection Lawyers in Society (Abel and Lewis 1988a; 1988b; 1989). The period since 1988 has seen an acceleration and intensification of the global socio-economic, cultural and political developments that in the 1980s were challenging traditional professional forms. Together with the striking transformation of the world order as a result of the fall of the Soviet bloc, neo-liberalism, globalisation, the financialisation of capitalism, technological innovations, and the changing demography of lawyers, these developments underscored the need for a new, comparative exploration of the legal professional field. This volume deepens the insights in volume 1, with chapters on legal professions in Africa, Latin America, the Islamic world, emerging economies, and former communist regimes. It also addresses theoretical questions, including the sociology of lawyers and other professions (medicine, accountancy), state production, the rule of law, regional bodies, large law firms, access to justice, technology, casualisation, cause lawyering, diversity (gender, race, and masculinity), corruption, ethics regulation, and legal education. Together with volume 1, it will inform and challenge conceptions of the contemporary profession, and stimulate and support further research.

Reconceptualizing Critical Victimology

Reconceptualizing Critical Victimology PDF Author: Dale Spencer
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498510272
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 268

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Book Description
Since the 1960s, the field of victimology has developed into a variegated discipline with its own theoretical and methodological traditions. In the early 1990s two texts were published—Towards a Critical Victimology (Fattah, 1992) and Critical Victimology (Mawby and Walklate, 1994)—that concretized critical victimology as a paradigm within victimology. Since then, the field has remained conceptually stale and with few a few exceptions there has not been a considerable lacuna of works from a critical perspective. Reconceptualizing Critical Victimology: Interventions and Possibilities provides a rejoinder to the two aforementioned texts and demonstrate how critical victimology can be reconceptualized, where interventions can be made in this victimological paradigm, and possibilities for future theorizing and research in this provocative field. Reconceptualizing Critical Victimology includes eleven papers on the forms of victimization and issues pertinent to victims written by leading and emerging international scholars in the field of critical victimology. It is interdisciplinary in scope and contains contributions from leading and emergent international scholars on victims and victimization. Reconceptualizing Critical Victimology serves as a crucible to demonstrate the complexities of and the multitude of factors that interact to complicate victim status, the vagaries of victim response, and the phenomenology of violence and victimization.

Transitional Justice in Law, History and Anthropology

Transitional Justice in Law, History and Anthropology PDF Author: Lia Kent
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000084744
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 206

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Book Description
Transitional justice seeks to establish a break between the violent past and a peaceful, democratic future, and is based on compelling frameworks of resolution, rupture and transition. Bringing together contributions from the disciplines of law, history and anthropology, this comprehensive volume challenges these frameworks, opening up critical conversations around the concepts of justice and injustice; history and record; and healing, transition and resolution. The authors explore how these concepts operate across time and space, as well as disciplinary boundaries. They examine how transitional justice mechanisms are utilised to resolve complex legacies of violence in ways that are often narrow, partial and incomplete, and reinforce existing relations of power. They also destabilise the sharp distinction between ‘before’ and ‘after’ war or conflict that narratives of transition and resolution assume and reproduce. As transitional justice continues to be celebrated and promoted around the globe, this book provides a much-needed reflection on its role and promises. It not only critiques transitional justice frameworks but offers new ways of thinking about questions of violence, conflict, justice and injustice. It was originally published as a special issue of the Australian Feminist Law Journal.

The Global Evolution of Clinical Legal Education

The Global Evolution of Clinical Legal Education PDF Author: Richard J. Wilson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107025613
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 350

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Book Description
Clinical legal education has revolutionized legal education, from its deepest origins in the nineteenth century to its now-global reach.

Alex Batesmith, Improving the Effectiveness of International Lawyers in Rule of Law and Transitional Justice Projects

Alex Batesmith, Improving the Effectiveness of International Lawyers in Rule of Law and Transitional Justice Projects PDF Author: Louise Mallinder
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 26

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Book Description
Improving personal effectiveness has been a popular subject for many decades in the business world. However, in transitional justice and rule of law, effectiveness has only relatively recently been a topic of interest, as researchers investigate reasons why international legal interventions succeed and why they fail. This paper examines the issue of effectiveness of rule of law and transitional justice interventions from the perspective of the actors themselves - the international lawyers - especially as they work with their national counterparts to achieve their objectives. The report analyses the barriers to intercultural effectiveness at the individual level for international lawyers. The main part of this paper then focuses on the specific knowledge, skills and values through which an international lawyer may be able to optimise their own intercultural effectiveness. In particular, we highlight the desirability of a full factual briefing before starting work in a different country, the need for effective intercultural communication and organisational skills and the importance of adopting a flexible attitude and an understanding of one's personal and professional limitations. We will also discuss how institutions hiring international lawyers can take also concrete practical steps to improve the success of interventions, by helping their staff and consultants to become more interculturally effective.The methodology for this paper is qualitative and more than fifty lawyers with experience working in international interventions were surveyed for their personal reflections on effectiveness in their workplace. The author of the paper has also drawn on his own experiences and discussions with both international and national colleagues, having spent more than ten years working in the field of international criminal law, transitional justice and rule of law development.This report was commissioned as part of the Lawyers, Conflict & Transition project - a three-year initiative funded by the Economic & Social Research Council that is run in partnership between the School of Law, Queen's University Belfast and the Transitional Justice Institute.

Negotiating the Power of NGOs

Negotiating the Power of NGOs PDF Author: Reem Wael
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108599168
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
This book focuses on the socio-political environment that allows for the impactful work of NGOs through their proximity to local communities. The book showcases how this space has helped South African women's rights NGOs to bring about crucial legal reforms, which are quite relevant to women's lived realities. Recognizing its limitations, the South African state encourages NGOs to work freely on the ground and with state institutions to ameliorate the conditions for women's rights. The outcome of this state-NGO dynamic can be seen in the numerous human rights gains achieved by NGOs in general, and by women's rights organizations specifically. In addition, vulnerable communities such as women living under customary law have a significantly better chance to access justice. The book then demonstrates the opposite scenario, using Egypt as a case study, where NGOs are viewed as a national threat, and consequently operate under restrictive rules.

Grassroots Activism and the Evolution of Transitional Justice

Grassroots Activism and the Evolution of Transitional Justice PDF Author: Iosif Kovras
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107166659
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 304

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Book Description
The families of the disappeared have long struggled to uncover the truth about their missing relatives. In so doing, their mobilization has shaped central transitional justice norms and institutions, as this ground-breaking work demonstrates. Kovras combines a new global database with the systematic analysis of four challenging case studies - Lebanon, Cyprus, South Africa and Chile - each representative of a different approach to transitional justice. These studies reveal how variations in transitional justice policies addressing the disappeared occur: explaining why victims' groups in some countries are caught in silence, while others bring perpetrators to account. Conceiving of transitional justice as a dynamic process, Kovras traces the different phases of truth recovery in post-transitional societies, giving substance not only to the 'why' but also the 'when' and 'how' of this kind of campaign against impunity. This book is essential reading for all those interested in the development of transitional justice and human rights.

Transitional Justice and the Prosecution of Political Leaders in the Arab Region

Transitional Justice and the Prosecution of Political Leaders in the Arab Region PDF Author: Noha Aboueldahab
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1509911340
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 200

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Book Description
The dramatic uprisings that ousted the long-standing leaders of several countries in the Arab region set in motion an unprecedented period of social, political and legal transformation. The prosecution of political leaders took centre stage in the pursuit of transitional justice following the 'Arab Spring'. Through a comparative case study of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen, this book argues that transitional justice in the Arab region presents the strongest challenge yet to the transitional justice paradigm. This paradigm is built on the underlying assumption that transitions constitute a shift from non-liberal to liberal democratic regimes, where often legal measures are taken to address atrocities committed during the prior regime. The book is guided by two principal questions: first, what trigger and driving factors led to the decision of whether or not to prosecute former political leaders? And second, what shaping factors affected the content and extent of decisions regarding prosecution? In answering these questions, the book enhances our understanding of how transitional justice is pursued by different actors in varied contexts. In doing so, it challenges the predominant understanding that transitional justice uniformly occurs in liberalising contexts and calls for a re-thinking of transitional justice theory and practice. Using original findings generated from almost 50 interviews across 4 countries, this research builds on the growing critical literature that claims that transitional justice is an under-theorised field and needs to be developed to take into account non-liberal and complex transitions. It will be stimulating and thought-provoking reading for all those interested in transitional justice and the 'Arab Spring'.